Showing posts with label Wine tasting descriptors. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Wine tasting descriptors. Show all posts

Friday, November 23, 2012

French's Green Bean Casserole

Thanksgiving has dwindled down, and Black Friday shoppers are out and about getting some real bargains, I am finally catching up with a new post, and do not feel too guilty for not being able to post a Thanksgiving post, as I have last year; but do feel bad for not wishing you all a Happy Thanksgiving at least the day before...but then, that would have had to be another post which I wasn't prepared for!

Last year we spent Thanksgiving with family and friends...a large gathering of at least 20 people, but this year was just our own family. Couldn't help thinking how the Super Storm Sandy survivors that lost everything spend their holiday...being thankful to at least have their lives spared. I also feel bad for some of my elderly neighbors living alone knowing that they are spending Thanksgiving all alone, but I already know that this is how they choose to do so...they want to be alone and often complain about every little thing that bothers them about neighbors. So how could you be neighborly to anti-social people when they refuse a nice gesture from others? (not like they haven't been invited; they want to be left alone...sad, but true)
Do you recognize this all American Green Bean Casserole? ...of course you do. I thought it was popular since the sixties, which I remembered, but after researching it, turns out that it was discovered in 1955 by the Campbell's Soup Company in their test kitchen making it with Cream of Mushroom Soup, and French's ...French Fried Onion Rings, which I only buy just for this casserole, although you can make an awesome crunchy crusted onion chicken with it, as well!
I remember way back when I first had this casserole in the sixties, it was made with canned green beans, then later years with frozen beans, but I of course have been making it with fresh cooked green beans, and also added about 1 Tbsp. of extra virgin olive oil to the soup when mixing it with the milk and soy sauce, and folding the some of the French Fried Onions into it. For some reason, I was always disappointed in the sauce when baking it, and it would have a dry and 'chalky' look, but not any more, it has a beautiful consistency, and it even improves on the flavor.

 I adapted the recipe from the 6 oz. (170g.) new plastic container of the French's French Fried Onions, using fresh cooked green beans, instead of canned or frozen.

French's Green Bean Casserole
slightly adapted; by Elisabeth

1 (10 3/4 oz.) can Campbell's Cream of Mushroom Soup
1/2 cup milk (you can use soy milk)
1 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
1 teaspoon soy sauce
salt and pepper to taste
1 plastic bag (already filled) fresh green beans; about 1 lb.
washed, cleaned, and cooked
1 1/3 cup French's French Fried Onions

In a large bowl, mix soup, milk, olive oil, soy sauce, salt and pepper, and fold in the the french fried onions, and the green beans. Have a 1-1/2 qt. oven proof casserole ready to spoon mixture in. Bake for 25 minutes, in a preheated 350 degrees F. oven. Remove from oven, and top with remaining onions...bake for an additional 5 minutes till onions get crispy and golden.

So, check out my fabulous Herb Stuffed 14 lb. Organic, (Brined) Roast Turkey, purchased at Whole Foods Market; the best and the most moist, flavorful turkey...ever! Also made Giblet Gravy, a Smooth Turkey Gravy, simple Herb Stuffing, Mashed Potatoes made with Sour Cream! My daughter made a Sweet Potato Casserole, Cranberry Sauce, Apple Cranberry Pie, and Pumpkin Pie...and we also had a Brussel Sprouts/Grapes vegetable...it was a beautiful, sunny, breezy day; we enjoyed our late lunch/early dinner outside, in a comfortable 73 degrees F. temperature in S. Florida! A lot to be thankful for, and counting our Blessings!




 No frills, no fancy platter...fresh out of the oven, after 5 1/2 hrs. partially tented with aluminum foil for the first 4hrs, baked in a 325 degree F. oven. Rubbed with Hungarian sweet paprika, salt, pepper, and canola oil...(as soon as the little red auto thermometer pops up; its ready) I folded the wings under, to prevent from burning the tip...(just a little habit of mine for chicken, as well)

Also added 1 cup chicken broth in the bottom of the disposable bake pan, and started to baste it after 3hrs, every 30 minutes.






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Saturday, September 22, 2012

Fresh Tomato Tart with Gorgonzola Cheese


As I have mentioned in my 'Silent Sunday' post, I made this beautiful rustic Tomato Tart...normally, I would have used a milder cheese, like Goat Cheese or a mild Cheddar Cheese but I had a block of sweet Gorgonzola cheese, imported from Italy that worked wonders to balance out the flavors with just a small amount of chopped parsley
and the perfectly ripe tomato slices
I may not make cupcakes...especially with 'fancy-schmancy' frosting and decorations; although I think they are gorgeous...and that reminds me of my dear sweet friend Joanna from
Chic& Gorgeous Treats...(whom I had the pleasure of meeting in person last year, in S. Francisco) she is every bit beautiful, sweet, bubbly and friendly in person...  as she is on her blog! Check out her most amazing blog that will put a smile on your face and will want to make, or wish you would/could make some of her creative desserts, cupcakes, and mini tarts.

At least Jo's tarts and cupcakes have natural fruit and fresh cream toppings, but some bloggers make cream frosting for cupcakes which are oh, so pretty and decorative, but the first thing a child would do is to lick off the extreme sugary and brightly tinted cream!
 
Just to give you an example, last week my little grandson Luca was crying at his kindergarten class at lunchtime because every child was enjoying their cupcake topped with a fancy blue frosting, and he had to tell his teacher he's not supposed to eat the cupcake. (he previously got sick from the colored butter cream before)

My daughter had to go to school to console him because he just kept saying "I'm not supposed to eat this"...the poor child is so allergic to so many buttery and synthetic products, that he already knows at such a young age what not to indulge in...even though he would like it, but his little tummy would not tolerate it!


Friday, July 6, 2012

Israeli Couscous, with Cannelini Beans

 When you are fortunate enough to have the basic herbs growing in your garden...as in my daughter's garden...even the basic basil, oregano, rosemary, thyme, and parsley, spells 'happiness'...I still have the get more parsley at the produce market, it's never enough; also my favorite, the dill, I also get a huge bunch at the market.
What is there not to love in these pearl-like perfect wheat little gems...can't ruin it when you boil it in water, as if you would cook pasta; it lets you know when its done, because it gets so puffed up, and you're ready to rinse it in cold water, and proceed with your recipe. You can serve this chilled, as a cold salad with vegetables of your choice, or you can serve it warm as a side dish, which how I made it with ingredients on hand in Lora's cupboard, and fresh plum tomatoes that I bought!
My sweet friend Jaime, @Mangiabella always raves about my Israeli couscous salad, and how she made it a few or more times for family and friends. She always mentions it to me...it's such an honor when someone makes your recipes, especially when its your own creation...and yes, both of these are my own creations. I first was introduced to Israeli couscous about 10 years ago, but only the last few years have I been making it more often. I guarantee you will love this, and so will your family.

Israeli Couscous with Cannelini Beans
created by; Elisabeth


16 ozs Israeli couscous
1- 14 1/2 cannelini beans
1 medium onion chopped
2 cloves garlic chopped
4 plum tomatoes diced small
fresh herbs, such as basil, oregano
and rosemary (sm. amt. chopped)
handful fresh Italian parsley chopped
2 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
salt and pepper to taste




First, heat olive oil in a wok or large skillet, cook the onion, garlic, until soft and wilted. Add your chopped herbs and stir a few minutes longer














...then add the fresh diced tomatoes, and saute for about 10 minutes.







In the meantime...you should have your couscous already cooked in boiling water, strained, and rinsed with cold water to keep from sticking, and cooking longer.
Keep the couscous in the strainer until ready to use.







Now, you can add the couscous to the tomato mixture, season with salt and pepper, and stir in the fresh chopped parsley.










Last you fold in the drained and rinsed beans, carefully fold in, and incorporate, and you are ready to serve. Adjust with more seasoning if you like, and more fresh herbs, as garnish, as well!...now wasn't this easy? I promise your will love this, and will make it over and over again, and you can substitute other vegetables just the way you would like to. The main thing is, that you have the couscous cooked first, and then you can be creative the way you desire!



Israeli Couscous...a guaranteed love at 'first bite'
 for recipe, click on link for,Israeli Couscous Salad








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Monday, April 30, 2012

Coconut Macaroons

To Guest Post? or not...That is the Question! Coconut Macaroons have been around for a long time; just don't confuse it with the Macarons...which is the French version of the beautiful egg whites, piped in a perfect circle, and sandwiched with another with so many different kinds of delicate and yummy fillings.
I remember well, making these easy amazing coconut cookies in the seventies, but flattening them down, and placing a bright red or green glazed cherry on each of the macaroons just for the Christmas holidays. Now, they are more fashionable, leaving them in their natural state, piled high, and just a light thin drizzle of melted down chocolate glaze.

Now, I've gotten away from the subject that I wanted to cover. I did not make these macaroons just now...not even recently. I made these just 2 days before I got my hands injured...exactly 2 weeks ago to use for a guest post...which took a different route. As you can see, this is my own guest post...and I'm the guest poster for myself!
In the nearly 2 years that I have been food blogging, I have made so many friends, through my blog, but mostly through the Foodbuzz community, which is so amazing! We all share the same mutual interest; which is FOOD!
Actually, even if it's not about food, but a different interest, we still end up celebrating an event with great food!

I do think it's a nice idea to guest post for a fellow blogger friend if the friend is in "need" ...in case of vacation, an illness, or some other reason, perhaps wanting to take a break, but whichever the reasons are, it's always an honor for both parties involved...sometimes things change, and you end up keeping your own guest post, so you might as well make the best of it...and honor "yourself"...after all, you deserve the honor!



Coconut Macaroons

adapted from Epicurious.com

1- 14 oz. package sweetened flaked coconut

2/3 cup sugar

6 Tbsp. all-purp flour

1/4 teaspoon salt

4 egg whites

1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips

2 Tbsp. canola, or vegetable oil



Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper.

In a large bowl, stir together coconut, sugar, flour and salt. In a medium bowl, beat the egg whites with

the vanilla extract, until soft peaks form. With a spatula, fold the egg whites into the coconut mixture, making

sure that all has been distributed into it, evenly.

With a small teaspoon drop cookies generously filling up the spoon, keeping them 2 inches apart. Mound cookies higher with your fingers so they don't look matted down.

Bake for 20 to 25 minutes till edges are golden and cookies are set. Top and sided of cookies should be slightly golden, as well.



Melt chocolate chips with oil, in a medium microwavable dish, for about 60 seconds. Take it out, and stir to make it smooth. (if not smooth enough, nuke for an additional 10 seconds longer)

Drizzle over cookies. Refrigerate 1 hour before serving.

Makes 24 cookies



Note: The best thing to use, and it's my tip a small, or medium plastic bottle with a small tip. (it's a clear plastic bottle used for sweet dessert decorations.) Use a funnel to spoon chocolate into it.

You can also use a small teaspoon to drizzle, or cut a tip on a corner of a plastic baggie (but in this case, it's a bit messy, and bag collapses)












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Friday, March 16, 2012

Farfalle Pasta with Cream, Salmon, and Peas

I've been making this delicious pasta since the nineties but cannot remember the original source...I just know that it's absolutely divine! The only difference is, that I cut down on the butter and the heavy cream used in this dish to lighten it up a bit. There are other similar pasta dishes out there but with the smoked salmon, instead of the fresh and they don't use the petite frozen peas, or garnish it with dill. The fresh salmon gives it a lighter taste where you don't get that "smoky" aftertaste from the smoked salmon.
This beautiful dish represent Spring, it is also linked to #greenslove @ Mis Pensamientos and will be honoring St. Patrick's Day...although it's far from being an Irish dish, but at least it's green!

Farfalle Pasta with Cream, Salmon, and Peas
my own creation

12 ounces  (1 1/2 pound) Farfalle Pasta
1 Tbsp. unsalted butter
1 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
1 shallot chopped
1/4 cup dry white wine
3/4 cup heavy cream
1 teaspoon grated lemon zest
juice of one fresh lemon
1/2 pound fresh salmon with skin on
2 Tbsp. sliced thin scallions (green part only)
2 Tbsp. fresh dill snipped with kitchen shears
sea salt, and freshly ground pepper

Boil pasta in a large pot, less than al-dente. Drain pasta, reserving 1/2 cup. In a large wok or skillet, saute shallots till soft and wilted. Add the wine and cook down until almost evaporated. Add cream, and bring to a boil.Add the peas, and just let it cook for a minute or two in the cream. In the meantime bake, or cook in a skillet the salmon piece adding the 1 Tbsp olive oil and sprinkle a little sea salt, and freshly ground pepper.Cook for about 8 minutes (will be cooking for an addition 2 minutes combined in the pasta)

Add pasta to cream mixture, along with the lemon juice, lemon zest. With a fork flake the salmon in small pieces off from the skin, and add to the pasta mixture. Add the scallions, 1 Tbsp. of the fresh dill, and add the reserved pasta water, if needed. Adjust the seasoning with sea salt and pepper.You can also drizzle a little bit of the extra virgin olive oil on top.
Serves 4


May you always have walls for the winds,
a roof for the rain, tea beside the fire,
laughter to cheer you, those you love near you,
and all your heart might desire.
`Irish Blessing
Happy St. Patrick's Day!
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Saturday, December 10, 2011

Everything But the "kitchen sink" Soup

Last week, when I mentioned I just didn't feel up to photographing my food...well, actually, in reality...just didn't feel like photographing my step-by-step directions, while making this amazing hearty, and so good for you, all fresh vegetable, and organic beef meatball soup! See, there it is... on the bottom, a little meatball, and on the right, next to the parsley, but it's sort of camouflaged by all the yummy grated Parmesan cheese! Even the Great Northern beans were from a bag of dry beans, and not canned!
The only thing that was canned, was the 28 ounce can of organic diced tomatoes, from Whole Foods. As a matter of fact, every piece of fresh vegetable was from whole Foods. 

I started out sauteing my chopped onions, chopped garlic, sliced celery, sliced carrots, in Canola oil, about 3 Tbsp. added some chopped fresh parsley, salt, and pepper, a couple bay leaves, ... added the canned diced tomatoes, and a 32 ounce container of organic beef broth, a dash of Worcestershire sauce, and bring it to a boil. Depending on how much vegetables you are using, if you use a lot, then you have to add more broth!
Now, where were we?...let's continue!

After the soup comes to a boil, turned the heat down to medium, and added, 1 large diced golden sweet potato, 2 peeled and diced golden beets, 1/2 lb. fresh, cut green beans. I made about 1 dozen small meatballs the day before, which was precooked, added that, and I cooked up a pot of dry Great Northern beans as well. Added that, as well. Pasta which was the tiny shell pasta was cooked up separately to add to the soup.

You don't need any thickening agents, such as flour, or cornstarch, the soup thickens on its own, just from the well cooked dry beans, and especially when you add the pasta to it, will thicken.

At the end, sprinkle some Parmesan cheese right into the soup, and ladle a nice portion out, drizzling extra virgin olive oil on it, for color, texture and flavor, and some more extra cheese.

I promise you, it will chase away any holiday "blues"...makes you feel full and satisfied, all you need is some crunchy bread to go with it, a glass or two of full bodied red wine....and have a nice dessert ...always room for dessert, just with a bowl of soup. If you would like to make this vegetarian, or vegan, just omit the cheese, and the meatballs, and use vegetable broth, instead of beef broth. You can add your choice of vegetables fresh or frozen, and you can actually use any kind of canned beans; they are just as good, and add that at the end of cooking time!

So this is my offering to you, for a chilly weekend, so stay warm, or come down to sunny Florida and enjoy our mild weather here!
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Monday, October 17, 2011

Smoky Chipotle Hummus

I am in one of those unprepared mode...not mood, but I suppose that would also label it as such! I have not been photographing anything I have made since last week. The only thing that inspired me to actually photograph, is just one shot of the Chipotle Hummus that so inspired me by Alisha's hummus that she made!
@ The Ardent Epicure.

She made this most amazing Cilantro Hummus with Chipotle Oil Drizzle... that I could just not resist! She has such an amazing vegetarian blog, with all the gorgeous exotic fruits, and vegetables and legumes she uses to prepare delicious and healthy dishes, and appetizers.

I did not have fresh cilantro on hand, but I did have dry cilantro, which was not my first choice, but it did the trick, and it was actually a vibrant green color, because I keep my dry herbs in my freezer, and they last a long time, and stay fresh and that makes my foods taste a lot better.

So as you see, this is the beautiful dry chipotle peppers that I used. They were purchased at my local produce market, and, the price is very inexpensive. All you have to do is to put them into boiling water, and simmer them on med. low temperature, until they get soft, so you can put them in the food processor. Use some of the liquid from the water as well to make your sauce the proper consistency.



The recipe I used is something I found online, that I adapted from was on> All Recipes.com
 
Linking my Smoky Chipotle Hummus, to: Full Plate Thursday, 10-20-11
@ Miz Helen's Country Cottage!

The change I made in the Smoky Chipotle Hummus recipe, was that instead of canned chipotle, I used the homemade sauce to combine it with the recipe. I also omitted the canned roasted tomatoes, and the sundried tomatoes, as well.I didn't have fresh cilantro, so I had to use 1 teaspoon dry cilantro. Extra virgin olive oil was drizzle on the top, making a well around the center, to hold the oil, for easier scooping, and dipping. Serve with toasted pita wedges. Quite a change from the ordinary plain hummus!

Here's a helpful hint, how to dry fresh cilantro, a question asked by Laurie @ how my time flys.
As a rule, I freeze my dry herbs, and spices. They have a much longer life in the freezer, and every time I use them, they are always fresh, and potent, and not lose their aroma and strength. Even if you don't want to freeze them, at least refrigerate them, and you will get the same results. The only two seasonings that I don't freeze or refrigerate is the salt and pepper, which is always kept at room temperature!


How to dry fresh Cilantro

Cilantro
Cilantro, which originated in Greece, has been grown as an herb for thousands of years. Today, this annual is used in cuisine in countries in Southeast Asia, the Middle East and the Americas. "Cilantro" is generally used to refer to the leaves of this plant. The seeds of the plant are usually called "coriander."

Growing Cilantro
You can buy cilantro as small plants from your local nursery and transplant them into the ground or into containers. These plants like the weather to be cool and sunny. Therefore, plant them where they can catch their rays during the morning and afternoon hours. Like us, these plants shouldn't be exposed to the sun during the mid-day hours.
If you want to plant your cilantro from seeds, you will need to do some groundwork before the seeds hit the soil. First, you have to crush each seed's husk a little. Then, the seeds should be soaked for one to two days before you plant them.
Plant seeds every six weeks or so during the growing season as cilantro is not a long lived plant.

How to Dry Fresh Cilantro: Leaves
Yes, you can buy dried cilantro at the store. Have you ever tried it? Dried cilantro has lost most of the attributes that makes cilantro "cilantro." While home dried leaves might be an improvement, these dried leaves will still leave much to be desired.
Your best bet is to wash the cilantro and remove most of the stems. Pat them dry with a towel and freeze individually on a cookie sheet. After the leaves are frozen, put them in freezer bags and place them back in your freezer until you need them.

How to Dry Fresh Cilantro: Coriander
When the seeds on the flower heads of your cilantro plant are starting to turn from green to brown, snip off the flower heads. Put the flower heads in brown paper bags and close the bags. Let the plant dry until the seeds fall off the heads easily.

Have a wonderful week...I will have more to offer in my next post!



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Friday, July 15, 2011

Chicken Paprikash...and Awards!

Whenever I crave for something that is a perfect comfort food that I know my entire family will like, I tend to turn towards my Hungarian favorite, which really does not need a recipe... knowing that I learned to make this delicious sauteed chicken in a rich paprika-sour cream sauce from my Hungarian "roots" from my mom, who was actually born in Transylvania (yes there is such a country, not just a myth)...it is and has been part of Romania for nearly a century now, after World War 1.
This special and true Hungarian dish is known world-wide to be an authentic Hungarian "staple" dish that is now just tossed aside in the culinary world...so sad! The way I see it in the "new wave" cooking, it doesn't even get listed as a "top 10".
I learned to make it the authentic way...even before I knew how to cook. Normally I would add the hot Hungarian wax pepper, which here in the states called "banana pepper?"...wonder why? Sure doesn't taste like a banana, it sure doesn't look like a banana, just because it's long and yellow?...that is absurd...again also...why do they even call it Hungarian wax pepper?...Do they wax it?...just the thought of that grosses me out!
At any rate, this is a simple, and easy way to make it...as long as you use authentic imported Hungarian Paprika, hot, or sweet...it's your choice!
I did not bother to do a step-by-step instructions on this...was not even going to take photos of this because I made this in a hurry, with my family telling me "we're starving"...so typical!

Do check out my friend Angie' blog @ Angie's Recipes, her delicious version of her Paprika Chicken. While you're there, browse through her blog and marvel at her many beautiful and yummy line up of entrees, and desserts, and do say hello!
I love to serve this awesome chicken paprikash with spaetzle...which is a little tedious to make so I usually serve it with wide egg noodles, or in the case with orechiette pasta. This was so delicious and we even had it for lunch the next day!

Saturday, March 26, 2011

Fresh Strawberry Tart, and Birthdays to Celebrate!

I decided to feature this photo of my lovely fresh Strawberry Tart, before slicing it, just when it finally set... with my homemade Strawberry "thick" glaze, or coulis, or sauce, but it really is a glaze, ... not your ordinary clear glaze, because instead of a cream filling, or maybe even a curd type of filling, I chose the thick glaze, which is so easy to make. I willing to bet no one has heard of this kind of tart with a light "Nilla" Vanilla Tart Shell, instead of a Shortbread type, or a Graham Cracker type tart. I'm not really a an avid baker, but I do get enthusiastic about easy things to make that does not require a lot of work...and I don't even want to get involved in "yeast dough" unless I have to. I leave all that to my daughter. She is always making yeast all kinds of things with yeast...especially, since I gave her the brand new Bread Machine, even with the instruction from my thrift find, at Goodwill, for $9.99. Now, I'm trying to find one for myself, which is difficult, and think people are getting more interest in "dough" making...and why not? You can't beat fresh homemade bread, rolls, and pizza dough!

Enough said...had a busy week with my daughter's lovely in-law's from Italy staying here for their vacation, and loving every minute of it. They are so sweet, down to earth, and are so adventurous trying out new foods, and desserts, so this is one of the desserts that anyone who loves fresh strawberries would love. Light, not too sweet and the vanilla cookie crust is a treat, just by itself!
I've always loved fresh strawberry pie, when strawberry is in season, and just simple, with a nice crust, glaze, and served with fresh whipped cream, and of course, Strawberry Shortcakes...another yummy fresh strawberry dessert.

The way I started to make this, is not having enough time to make a fresh pie dough, and not wanting to buy frozen...I didn't have graham crackers or crumbs in my cupboard for the crust, but I just bought a huge box of Nilla Vanilla wafers from Costco's that I wanted to make a nice Banana Cream Pie with it, and ended up making this quick dessert instead. I realize the glaze takes up a pint of strawberries, just like the whole strawberry pieces, but at
$1.75 a pint, not too expensive for two.

Monday, March 14, 2011

Cocoa Brownies with Browned Butter and Walnuts

I was so determined to make these brownies from my Bon Appetit magazine, but I just hesitated because I have never made brownies with browned butter. I do like browned butter on pasta, but have not tried it in a cake or brownie recipe. Browned butter does have a rich, and nutty flavor, so why not add it in the brownies. Also, one other important result, that the recipe did promise, is the fudgy  and chewy outside, with a shiny, crackly top. Just look how it turned out...yumm! It was not very popular with my little ones, (my grandchildren)...my grandson was trying to pick out the walnut pieces, but I had one cup of toasted walnut pieces in the batter. It did not call for toasting the walnuts, but I know that toasting nuts would release the oils from the nuts, and would make it more tasty, and crunchy.

Tuesday, March 1, 2011

Hungarian Lecsó (lecho)


The other day, I found a "treasure" in my local supermarket, Publix, which I'm proud to announce. A gorgeous bag of local sweet mini peppers, in assorted colors. When I opened the bag, the fresh, and sweet aroma just permeated throughout my little kitchen. I have been waiting for these amazing little sweet, and crunchy, colorful peppers, that when I picked up the bag from the special stand, a little old lady asked me..."are they real?...I didn't want to be mean,  and say..."no, they're plastic"...she really meant well, and I wasn't about to make a "snarky remark!"
Such a huge bag of these gorgeous peppers can be made different ways. My second choice: Roasted peppers...and why not? They are ever so delicious, and with these tiny peppers, you almost don't even have to remove the skins, after roasting them. Just drizzle vegetable oil on the peppers on a aluminum foil lined bake pan, and add pieces of garlic, or chopped garlic, salt and pepper, and fresh rosemary, and bake at 425 degrees for about 45 minutes. Leave the little peppers whole, when you roast them. It's even more delicious when you open them after they're done. It is not hot, or spicy, just sweet, and pleasant yummy flavor.
I still had the second portion of the bag of new red potatoes, so I pre-boiled them, first, cutting them in half, and boil them till almost done, and sauteed them in extra virgin olive oil, and butter, and added fresh chopped parsley, freshly grated sea salt, and fresh ground black pepper, and made an amazing vegetarian meal out of the lecso, potatoes, and nice crusty bread, to dip into the rich tomato/paprika sauce. "Out of this World"...amazing, and healthy dish!

Hungarian Lecsó (lecho)
my own recipe

About 2 lbs. of sweet assorted, or hot peppers
1 large onion sliced, or chopped
3 cloves garlic chopped
1 large can of a 28 oz. diced tomatoes
or you can use about 4 fresh chopped tomatoes
4 Tablespoon vegetable oil
salt and pepper to taste
2 Tablespoon sweet Hungarian paprika
1/2 cup of water

In a large skillet, saute onion and garlic over medium high heat, till onion gets a golden color. Pull skillet away from the heat, and add the salt, pepper, and paprika. Stir, to combine, add the water, and add the mini peppers, cut into half, removing the seeds, or with the larger peppers, cut into strips, and also removing the seeds. Stir to incorporate, and saute for a few minutes, then add the tomatoes, and cook slow, over medium heat until peppers get slightly softened, and tomatoes get to a thick consistency. Serve them as a side dish, or appetizer, or save some to add to scrambled eggs, which is a super delicious breakfast treat. Serves 4-6

This is the bag of the sweet peppers.They are from a local Florida produce farm. They are so incredible, and delicious. So full of natural vitamin C.

Monday, November 8, 2010

Braised Red Cabbage with Cider & Apples



I finally got around to making my foodie friend's recipe for this Braised Red Cabbage with Cider & Apples posted on her blog. She has the most amazing blog, called Angie's Recipes.Every kind of dish, weather it's comfort food, ethnic, or some fabulous dessert, you will want to stay, and explore the rest of her blog. Just when you thought you found the best recipe, there' a lot more to find....so be patient, because she has no less than about 65 comments, and more a day. But you know what?...she will respond back to you. She is totally laid back, and super nice.

Thank you Angie, like I mentioned, I even have the same lead crystal glass dish...unfortunately, I just didn't want to empty all those wonderful shells that I collected on the beach, here in Palm Beach, Florida. By the way, the glass dish was purchased at Goodwill last year, for $2.99, again, another great thrift find, and a wonderful recipe. If you want this recipe, you have to click over to Angie's blog!

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Wednesday, September 22, 2010

Italian Sausage and Peppers

I was not going to post this...seems like I'm contradicting myself about eating healthy. Actually this is not so bad, considering I made it as light as possible. No grease, no extra fat...this would certainly can be categorized in the Atkins diet, maybe even Weight Watchers?...been there, done all that...and so, the saga continues.

Before I post the recipe for my Italian sausage and peppers, I will proudly show off my Suzanne Somers stainless steel skillet, 10 in. in diameter, has a nice non-skid handle, and the best part was, that this skillet has never been used by any one. I paid $2.99 for it, at Goodwill, and I've had it for over 1 year. In order to cook or fry on high heat, you must either have a cast iron skillet, or a calphalon, or a heavy duty stainless steel, as it is in this case. You will only destroy you nice non-stick pan. I absolutely love this frying skillet, it's easy to clean, even if you get burns on there. When you soak it in hot soapy water, the stain just rolls off. I am all green practically, with cleaning supplies. Just simply scour it with baking soda...takes the place of the strong chemical scouring powder, and you can also clean your sink with the baking soda, and will freshen up your garbage disposal. So now, on to my recipe...actually not really a recipe, just the instruction of how I came up with this great idea for the sausage and peppers. Not drowning it in oil, not letting it get lost in red sauce, but everything fresh from my refrigarator, that needs to be used up, anyway.

Italian Sausage and Peppers

2 links of mild Italian sausage
1 link of hot Italian sausage
(about 1 lb.)
1 green bell pepper
2 Hungarian wax peppers (or banana peppers
or Cubanelle, you can variate the peppers of your choice)
1 large onion
1 or 2 cloves garlic, sliced
2 Tablespoons vegetable oil
2 medium tomatoes (fresh)
1/2 cup vegetable broth or plain water is good
salt and peppers, (optional)
(sausage and peppers, are hot and salty enough)
1 teaspoon Hungarian paprika
Cut sausages with a sharp blade knife, to 3 inch pieces. ( slices will just fall apart, so this is suggested.) Cut peppers lenghtwise into about 1 inch strips, (not too thin) Cut onion in half, and cut fairly thick slices, lengthwise, also. Tomatoes cut in half, and also sliced thick into lentghwies slices. (Everything is cut lenghtwise, so they look nice and uniformed.)  First, start with the sausage to brown them in the vegetable oil, on med.high heat, for about 10 minutes, so they get nice and brown. Lower the heat, and just cook them low, for an additional 15 minutes. Add all the peppers, onion, garlic, and tomatoes, and saute them, leaving the sausages in the skillet, but at this time, add half of the broth or water. It will start to caramelize it, and keep cooking them for an additional 15-20 minutes, adding the rest of the broth to keep getting nice and juicy, this way it will not burn, or get dry. You should end up with perfectly cooked sausages, and just the right texture of the peppers, and onions. The tomatoes will stay nice and soft, and not falling apart. Serves 2.
note: 
Leftovers are great for the next morning with scrambled eggs, or reheated and served in a hoagie roll with melted mozzarella. (that is if you're cooking this for 1, but if for 2, you will not have any leftovers.) If you like pork, this is an ultimate comfort food!
Another excerpt, from WOMEN FOOD AND GOD

The shape of your body obeys the shape of your beliefs about love, value and possibility. To change your body, you must first understand that which is shaping it. Not deprive it. Not shame it. Not do anything but accept--yes, Virginia--understand it. Because if you force and deprive and shame yourself into being thin, you end up a deprived, shamed fearful person who will also be thin for ten minutes. When you abuse yourself (by taunting or threatening yourself) you become a bruised human being no matter how much you weigh.
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